President’s Corner

TelCoa thanks U.S. Representatives Jim Himes, Rosa DeLauro, and Elizabeth Esty for introducing the Multi-State Worker Tax Fairness Act, H.R. 4085, 113th Congress.

We strongly support this crucial legislation. The bill would finally eliminate the telecommuter tax, a steep penalty often resulting in double taxation of income that interstate telecommuters earn at home. The telecommuter tax unfairly burdens telecommuters and their employers and limits telework adoption. Congress must make the Multi-State Worker Tax Fairness Act law!

TelCoa and other advocates are working to secure the bill’s enactment, but we need your help!

>>> Read More...

Guest Columnist

Make the tax system safe for interstate telecommuting: pass H.R. 4085

This is reprinted from the OUPblog. Information on subscribing to this is available at the end of this article.

By Edward Zelinsky

Telecommuting benefits employers, employees, and society at large. Telecommuting expands work opportunities for the disabled, for those who live far from major metropolitan areas, and for the parents of young children who value the ability to work at home. Telecommuting also removes cars from our crowded highways and enables employers to hire from a wider and more diverse pool of potential employees.

It is thus anomalous that New York State’s personal income tax discourages interstate telecommuting by taxing the compensation non-resident telecommuters earn on the days such telecommuters work at their out-of-state homes. Under the misleading label “convenience of the employer,” New York subjects telecommuters to double income taxation by their state of residence as well as by New York – even though New York provides non-resident telecommuters with no public services on the days such interstate telecommuters work at their out-of-state homes outside of New York’s borders.

>>> Read the entire blog at...

Hot Topics & Links

"Working from home not for everyone, but it can still be a 'win-win' for many workers and employers" is an article in the Cleveland Plain Dealer featuring TelCoa President Chuck Wilsker and Advisory Board member Diane Stegmeier.

For the complete article,
> click-here...

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Broadband

Click here to go to The National Broadband Plan.

 

Broadband and Telecommuting: Helping the U.S. Environment and the Economy

December 2010

Joseph P. Fuhr,
Economics Widener University Chester, PA, USA, and The American Consumer Institute, Washington, D.C., USA.

Stephen Pociask,
The American Consumer Institute, Washington, D.C., USA.

ABSTRACT
This study examines how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. through the widespread delivery of broadband services and the expansion of telecommuting. Telecommuting can reduce greenhouse gas emissions over the next 10 years by approximately 588.2 tons of which 247.7 million tons is due to less driving, 28.1 million tons is due to reduced office construction, and 312.4 million tons because of less energy usage by businesses. This paper explores these broadband services and their effects on the environment, specifically as a means to achieve better and cleaner energy use, while enhancing economic output, worker productivity and the standard of living of American consumers.

 

Click here to read the entire report: Broadband and Telecommuting _ Helping the U.S. Environment and the Economy

 

 

Rural Broadband at a Glance, 2009 Edition
By Peter Stenberg and Sarah Low, editors
Economic Information Bulletin No. (EIB-47) 6 pp, February 2009
Published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture

 

Three-quarters of U.S. residents used the Internet to access information, education, and services in 2007. Broadband Internet access is becoming essential for both businesses and households; many compare its evolution to other technologies now considered common necessities—such as cars, electricity, televisions, microwave ovens, and cell phones. Although rural residents enjoy widespread access to the Internet, they are less likely to have high-speed, or broadband, Internet access than their urban counterparts. Circumstantial evidence suggests that the difference in access may lie in the higher cost and limited availability of broadband Internet in rural areas. As a result, rural residents depend more on Internet use outside of the home, in places like the library, school, and work, where broadband Internet access is available.

Click here to read the entire report.

 

 

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